Sign my
GuestBook

NS 3700 class

4-6-0 comparison

As I was writing a brief history of the 3700 class I felt the urge to compare the 4-6-0 classes in the Netherlands so I decided to dedicate a separate page to it. I also included the 3700 tank versions (classes 6000 and 6100) and three classes from abroad: the GWR King, LMS Black Five and the German P8. Of course any comparison is incomplete by its nature but it is just intended as an impression, no more.

A pictorial introduction of the classes

3500I

Built: 8 In service: 1908-1920 Last out of service: 1946 Preserved: None

Builder's photo Beyer Peacock 1908. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151378

3500II

Built: 49, 22 to NS

In service:

1907-1915, 1946 NS

Last out of service: 1952 NS Preserved: None

3505 in Zwolle between 1946 and 1952. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151468

3600

Built: 8 In service: 1910-1914 Last out of service: 1953 Preserved: None

NCS nr 71 (later NS 3601) probably between 1915-1920 (brown livery).
Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151382

3700

Built: 120 In service: 1910-1928 Last out of service: 1957 Preserved: 1

Builder's photo Werkspoor 1912. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 808476

3900

Built: 32 In service: 1929-1930 Last out of service: 1957 Preserved: None

Builder's photo Henschel 1930. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151494

4000

Built: 15 In service: 1945-1946 Last out of service: 1956 Preserved: None

Builder's photo NOHAB 1945. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151455

6000

Built: 26 In service: 1913-1916 Last out of service: 1957 Preserved: None

Builder's photo Beyer Peacock 1913. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 151429

6100

Built: 10 In service: 1929 Last out of service: 1957 Preserved: None

Builder's photo Werkspoor 1929. Source: ©Collection Het Utrechts Archief, Catalogue number 163261

GWR 6000 class "King"

Built: 31 In service: 1927-1930
(+1 in 1936)
Last out of service: 1962 Preserved: 3

King Edward II at Didcot Railway Centre 2014. ©René F. Vink 2017

LMS Black Five

Built: 842 In service: 1934-1951 Last out of service: 1968 Preserved: 18

"Black Five" 45231 speeding along the Settle-Carlisle at Helwith Bridge. ©René F. Vink 2017

German BR 38 (ex-P8)

Built: 3946 In service: 1906-1930 Last out of service: 1974 (Germany) Preserved: appr. 18

P8 2412 in the Linke Hoffmann Busch museum in Salzgitter (not publicly accessible). ©René F. Vink 2017

Table of main dimensions

Subject 3500I 3500II 3600 3700 3900 4000 6000 6100 King B5 P8
Grate area (m2) 2.60 2.80 2.84 2.84 3.16 3.25 2.04 2.84 3.19 2.58 2.64
Heated area firebox (m2) 13.5 15.3 16 15 17 14.5 13 15 18 16 14.6
Heated area tubes (m2) 95 135.7 140 130 150 147 108 130 187 137 136.6
Heated area superheater (m2) 34 42.4 83.5 41 53 50 34 41 29 34 54.3
Boiler pressure (bar) 14 14 12 12 14 12 12 12 17 15 12
Cyls 2 2hp 2lp 4 4 4 3 2 4 4 2 2
Cylinder diameter (mm) 510

425hp

630lp

400 400 420 500 508 420 413 470 575
Driver diameter (mm) 1,980 1,780 1,900 1,850 1,850 1,890 1,850 1,850 1,981 1,829 1,750
Water (m3) 15.9 18 20 18 28 22.5 9 12 18 18 21.5
Coal (tons) 5 7 5 6 6 7 3 4 6 9 7
Axle load (tons)       16.0     16 18 22.9 21 17.7
Weight loco and tender,
operational (tons)
100 111 118 115 147 137 93 108 142 73+? 128
Length (mm) 17,881 18,740 19,867 19,700 20,410 20,775 14,625 16,300 20,780 19,400 18,590
Top speed (km/h) 100 100 110 110 110 120 100 110 120   100
Tractive effort (kgf) 8,130 14,390 9,250 9,590 12,330 11,000 7,730 9,950

15,057

(18,284)

9,508

(11,546)

10,000

 

Remarks

  • variations within a class are possible due to engineering changes over the span of delivery or due to different builders. I tried to find the typical vlues.
  • The tractive effort is calculated with a factor as a percentage of the maximum boiler pressure. In the UK this factor was usually set at 85% where in Europe 70% was used. For reasons of comparison I have adjusted the tractive effort of the UK locomotives to the European norm and listed the original UK values in brackets.
     

Observations

Compared to international standards the 3700 class at first sight did not do badly. Originally the top speed of 90 km/h was on the low side but it was successively raised to 110 km/h. If we realise though that the P8 was classified as a moderate passenger service locomotive rather than an express locomotive, and was considered as a Jack-of-all-trades, one can conclude that the Dutch standards were not overly high. The Swiss A3/5 (3500) easily outclassed the 3700 despite being a compound engine and the 3700 being single expansion. And the GWR "King"s simply matched two 3700s!

All in all the 3700 was not a locomotive to be ashamed of, although not very modern or progressive in its design, though the classification as express locomotive may be a bit flattered by international standards.